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Feb 152013
 
 February 15, 2013  Posted by  At Home, Hot Deals
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That utility bill jumped so high this month that it should have won an Olympic medal. You can bring it down by being mindful of your consumption. Your results will vary, but even the smallest of changes can help the bottom line:

Chimney talk. Do you have a working fireplace? Make sure you turn down the furnace when it is in use. You can increase your fireplace efficiency by opening a nearby window just an inch or so. This allows the fireplace to draw cooler air into the chimney and push warm air into the room. Close the fireplace damper when it is not in use.

Take your temperature. Programmable thermostats are worth the hassle of installation. You can put one in by yourself – but it is easier if you have a set of jeweler’s screwdrivers and good eyesight. Set the timer to lower the temperature at night and when you are away from the house. It’s also tempting to turn up the heat when you come in from the cold, but you can save money if you take off your coat and put on a sweater, giving your body time to adjust to the inside temperature. If you have floor registers, keep them clear of furniture, toys, draperies and other items that may block the heat.

Save while you sleep. Ask your electric company if they have a “time-of-use” or TOU rate. You can save money by switching your usage of certain appliances away from peak times of the day. Save without any discomfort by running the dishwasher or setting timers for pools or sprinklers to run at night.

Security flashlight. Do you turn on lights for those nightly bathroom visits? Do your children ask to keep a light on when they sleep? Consider using a flashlight instead. Mechanically powered flashlights are often kept for emergency use, but there is no reason you can’t use them all the time. When you shake the flashlight, energy passes through a coiled wire and is collected and stored in a capacitor. Don’t worry: You don’t have to know how it works, just that it can be recharged over and over again. And the kids will love having their own flashlights. Beware of fakes that actually have batteries inside – the shaking is only for your amusement and the flashlight eventually bites the dust.

Group plug. When you turn off the television, all those wonderful connections stay on. The DVD player, the video game player, even the cable box is on standby. They all lurk quietly, red eyes gleaming, clocks ticking off the time until you reach for that remote. They use “vampire energy” — a trickle of electricity that many appliances draw just by being plugged into the wall. But it is a real pain to unplug them all, and many are attached to outlets behind furniture. Enter the Smart Strip. Plug your television to the main plug on a smart strip and plug all the accessories into the spots dedicated to “responders” or devices used with the television. Then, when you turn off the television, everything else is turned off at the same time. You can also use the strip for computers and their corresponding gadgets. The strip (which is also a surge protector) uses energy, but nothing compared to the total energy consumed by the appliances you’ve plugged into it.

Image by Pixomar, freedigitalphotos.net

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Rosie Wolf Williams

Rosie Wolf Williams was born into a thrifty family. One of five children, Rosie learned at an early age to save without being miserly. Having fun is an important part of life, too! Her parents use to say, "Use it up. Wear it out. Make it do, or do without." The mom of two adult sons, Rosie has spent her life saving, spending wisely. She owns her own fixer-upper (paid in full) and creates multiple streams of income, from part-time seasonal jobs to cashing in cans for the deposit. Now single, she's always looking for ways to live within her means and, as she says, "beat the man!" A freelance writer for nearly 20 years, Rosie has written for Woman's Day, U.S.A. Weekend, Boys' Life, AARP the Magazine, and Creative Living.

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